The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by eldin raigmore » Fri 23 Jun 2017, 01:36

Axiem wrote:Next Question: does your culture have any "shortly after birth" or "coming of age" ceremonies? (For example, infant "baptism" and young adult "confirmation" in some Christian circles)
Well, since that's a polar question, the short answer "Yes" would be true of my main conculture (or concultures?);
but since I don't feel I can elaborate at this time, I don't feel I've earned the right to ask a "next question".
IMO Axiem's question is still the current one:
Next Question: Does your culture have any "shortly after birth" or "coming of age" ceremonies? (For example, infant "baptism" and young adult "confirmation" in some Christian circles)
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Axiem » Fri 23 Jun 2017, 04:19

I suppose I should have added some sort of "if so, what are they?" bit to that question...
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by elemtilas » Sun 25 Jun 2017, 22:54

Axiem wrote:Next Question: does your culture have any "shortly after birth" or "coming of age" ceremonies? (For example, infant "baptism" and young adult "confirmation" in some Christian circles)
"Uurg warriors and mothers have two names: one given at birth, and one taken upon the completion of the first battle season, or after the birth of the first child. There is no disgrace in dying during ones first battle season, for indeed more than half of all young warriors die sometime in their first season." (De Barbaros, Starlenson, 1989)
"For a people who spend so much time naked, Alghadaine marry, conduct sexual relations and give birth in quiet privacy. It is rare for Alghadaine couples to marry in publick; most simply go out into the forest with a close friend or two and make a quiet statement of marriage and exchange of tokens. Alghadaine marriage tokens consist of an arm band that the woman wears on her right arm; but the man is adorned with a lock of his wife’s hair that she ties around his neck and makes it to hang down his back. It is said that this is to ever be a reminder to him, and a warning to other women as well!, that he has a woman waiting for him when he wanders.

Since houses are small and only one family lives in each; their relations are not so open to public view as are those of other Daine. And when a woman is about to deliver, she takes up residence in a house set apart from the rest by some space. There, she is visited only by the midwives, who minister to her and ensure that any curious onlookers are shooed away. When the baby is born, the midwife presents it to the father who introduces it to folk and pronounces its name, as happens in many other Daine tribes." (On the Wildings, Norwich, 2003)
"When a child is born, a fire is lit outside the house where the birth took place and the midwife announces to the waiting people whether its a girl or boy and also the new childs name is announced by the father. A first ring is pierced into the left ear.

When the elders feel the time is right, and the child has matured enough, he comes of age; usually after about thirty years have passed since his birth. At this time, he is no longer called by the androgenous term “child”, but properly by bradi or nima which mean man and woman respectively. The newly made adult takes an adult or chosen Name, and along with a feast receives a third earring." (On the Use of Earrings (from Wildings), Norwich, 1721)
"The Sharrundaine, those Miserable Daine who infest our fair city have a strange custom regarding their hair. Many women, when they are pregnant dye their usually dark hair some strange colour, like blue or green. After the birth of the child, she washes out the colour, thus returning it to its natural state. Others, when they are pregnant for the first time, use some strange technique to remove the colour from their hair. Each time they have a child, they dye a portion of their hair. Such Sharrundaine women that follow this practice make for an interesting spectacle indeed, once they have borne a number of children." (On Hairstyles (from Wildings), Norwich, 1667)
"The birth of any Daine child is attended by much ceremony and celebration. Before the happy event may be celebrated, though, there is much anxious waiting. It is known that a certain number of still births and abortions occur for every live birth, and of all live births, a number will not survive infancy; thus the Daine have developped an especial attachment to their babies and children, and consider each one of them particularly precious. They never induce abortion except in rare circumstances where it is assured that the mother will die in childbirth or before, neither do they expose their infants. Thus, Daine reserve their celebrations for live births, yet make themselves ready for a family’s tragedy.

The birth itself is a mysterious event, for men anyway, attended only by the mother her close kin and kith (usually her sisters and friends) and her midwife. Men are not allowed to attend, and may not even approach the birthing place. Rather, they must be content to await outside, anxiously listening for the sounds emanating from within.

A special birth house is set aside for the use of birthing women. In small clanholdings, this might consist of nothing more than a segregated room or suite set aside for the purpose from the main part of the house. In larger villages, a small house is built especially for the purpose. They are made cosy and secure inside, as the mother will spend the last days of her pregnancy in and around this house. It is generally kept closed and even when not in use or when it is being aired out, men are not allowed to enter. The birth house is often a fairly simple set of rooms decorated much the same as any other Daine house, having bed boxes, low benches and a table.

The midwife must be a woman, and is a specially trained healer who has not only great experience in the general healing arts, but is taken as an apprentice to an experienced midwife. Some midwives will only take on apprentices that themselves have borne children, presumably so that they will be empathetic to the experiences of their charges.

While birthing is not a great secret, few women talk with their men about the experience; preferring to reserve the details for other women who can share the experience with them. What is known is that Daine women squat to give birth, supported by their friends and relations; after the birth and expulsion of the placenta, the cord is tied off and the woman takes a ritual nibble of the placenta. It’s recalled amongst older women that when they inhabited the City in the old days, new mothers were often so hungry that they’d devour the placenta entire. Later this seems to have developped into a birth ritual.

After the baby is cleaned off, it’s brought outside to the waiting father and the couple’s male relations and other friends. He has the happy duty of of presenting it to the clan and informing everyone of its sex and name. Thereafter, everyone begins yipping and yowling, the midwife whisks the baby back into the birth house to be with its mother (often shooing away curious men) and the feasting begins outside. The birth feast will begin immediately and last long into the night or the next day. When she’s ready, mother and baby will be sent home from the birthing house.

Not all babies are born alive, and Daine everywhere are prepared to console parents of the stillborn. The parents who had hoped for so much and who so looked forward to the joys and sorrows of raising the child are now left to mourn and weep, and their friends and families are left to console them. The birth feast turns into a funeral and funerary meal. While the funeral is much less complex for a newborn, the grief is every bit as pointed and it agrees in all the basics with the funeral of an older person. The body is borne out to the boneyard by the parents and is left exposed; any bones left after the flesh is devoured by beasts are taken to the catacomb.

In the event that two women give birth at the same time and one baby is born dead, people will naturally be torn between joy and sadness. It is usually considered best to celebrate the life of the baby that made it; but to be especially supportive of the family in mourning. (Birth Customs in Westmarche (from Wildings), Norwich, 2003)
Next Question: Does your culture have any before or after death customs?

"The Onomatismists are a specialist order of monks in Kemeteia-Misser whose sole function is to recall the dead of the district to mind by unceasing chanting of lists of brief obituaries. As many as twelve lists of names are read simultaneously by twelve cantors; the body of monks supplying the responsive parts. The essential form of the chant is:
  • C. name
  • R. who died in the year
  • C. year of the year name, month of month name
  • R. who did the work
  • C. work of a occupation or singular deed
  • R. we recall and pray.


Upon the termination of the last response, a monk strikes a small bronze bell and the cantor begins again with the next name.

The Onomatismists have lists of names of people who died in a given district going back sometimes as far as two thousand years, roughly contemporaneous with the founding of the earliest Kristian communities in the Empire. Each monk wears a grey hooded robe of cotton which is bound with a long cord and carries a string of wooden beads with one hundred and forty-five beads. After the one hundred and forty-fourth name is read, a short canticle of prayers and appropriate scriptural readings is recited, followed by the phrase "We recall and pray for these who have crossed over before us."

It is not known how complete or spotty the lists are, but it is likely that the lists for the last thousand years or so, since the firm establishment of Kristianity in the Empire, are very complete.

The lists are read, not in alphabetical order, but in order of death date. Because each Kristian parish keeps meticulous records of births, baptisms, marriages, deaths and other vital statistics, the work consists largely of reading out of a copy of the local parishes' death register.

The monks recite names from sunrise to sunset, taking a break at mid day for meditation, rest or other tasks. Name recital does not take place on Sundays, which is reserved for attending the liturgy and resting from labor. Not all the monks in the community are attending to the recitation at all times. There are other duties to be performed in the community's house: general housekeeping, food preparation, copying of new records or replacing old and worn records.

Onomatismistic communities are generally attached to one of the larger churches in a city or town. Smaller parishes are encouraged by the bishops to transcribe and forward their death registries to a nearby Onomatismistic community for insertion into their litanies." (Guide to The World)
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by alynnidalar » Mon 03 Jul 2017, 15:45

(and now it's time for... math!

At approximately 30 seconds per person, it would take 72 minutes to read a full gross of obituaries. Adding in the prayers/scripture recitals and allowing for a short break, sips of water, stumbling over weird names, etc., let's suggest the full cycle ends up at about an hour and a half. (this is rounded up quite a bit; I suspect the actual time would be several minutes less)

Sunrise to sunset would, of course, depend on the time of year and latitude, but I assume it'd always average out to 12 hours. If the midday break is (on average) hour and a half, you'd end up with (on average) 10.5 hours a day of recitation, or 7 cycles, or 42 cycles a week for a total of 6,048 obituaries per week per cantor. At about 52 weeks a year, that's about 2184 cycles a year, or 314,496 obituaries. Per cantor. With 12 going at once, that's almost 3.8 million obituaries a year!

Eesh! That's a lot!

Now I need a way to figure out approximately how many people would be likely to be on the rolls for a given district, and thus how frequently they'd start over with the list... but I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader [;)] )
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Axiem » Mon 03 Jul 2017, 20:41

elemtilas wrote:Next Question: Does your culture have any before or after death customs?
I wish I could answer this for Kuvia currently, but I cannot; it's something that I'm mulling over.

On the other hand, I can answer this for Entleis!

Entleis almost entirely does burial-at-sea for their funerary rites. (Cremation would be used in some cases where they can't easily get the body to the sea, and the ashes would later be spread in the water; this is much more likely in the colonies). Entleis itself being a chain-of-islands nation, this usually isn't that big of a deal.

A lot of this is driven by the general belief of the afterlife, in that there are the islands "Enthala" (literally "island of dawn") and "Endras" (literally "island of dusk")—effectively "heaven" and "hell"—that souls are divided between for their eternal whatever. It's known that practically speaking, the boat eventually sinks, and the bodies are dumped on the ocean floor, but symbolically, it begins the soul's journey to its final resting place.

Funerary rites are typically done within the first week or so of death. A traditional mourning period goes for a month from death-date, though I don't know the full details on that period.

Next question: what material do your conpeople make their clothes out of?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by alynnidalar » Fri 07 Jul 2017, 14:59

Given my recent post on Sanmran clothing, it just seems appropriate for me to answer this question too, doesn't it?

In the modern era, clothing can be made from any material imaginable: cotton, polyester, even spandex! Historically, cotton or wool would have been used for most clothing; kapan 'overcoats' in particular were usually made of wool (or silk, in formal contexts). Formal clothing was (and often still is) made of embroidered silk or brocade; in particular, sariki robes are almost always made of silk. (a so-called "modern" sariki might be made out of a cheaper material with a printed design instead of embroidery, but you can only wear those to kind of formal events, not super formal events)

I would wager that cotton and polyester and mixes thereof are the most common materials in modern times, however.

Next question: what sort of agriculture/gardening takes place in your culture? I don't mean just commercial farms (although that'd be an answer too), but do people have kitchen gardens, pots of herbs on the kitchen windowsill, grow flowers next to the front step, etc., in addition to more traditional farming?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Glenn » Mon 10 Jul 2017, 07:16

alynnidalar wrote:Next question: what sort of agriculture/gardening takes place in your culture? I don't mean just commercial farms (although that'd be an answer too), but do people have kitchen gardens, pots of herbs on the kitchen windowsill, grow flowers next to the front step, etc., in addition to more traditional farming?
My conworld is not very well-developed (alas), but I can answer this one, albeit briefly:

The Kiarlonchu do indeed engage in the kind of agriculture that you speak of; in addition to larger-scale cultivation of crops for subsistence or commercial use (including rice and other grain crops, fruit trees such as apples and apricots (depending on the region), viticulture (primarily by the Coastland peoples), and the tea plantations on their overseas colony of Kasani), it is common for ordinary people to maintain small plots for vegetables and herbs within their extended family compounds. Even in the cities, such family compounds are a common form of architecture, and people maintain garden plots as best they can, while wealthy families (such as the higher-ranked Academicians) may have gardens of flowers and ornamental shrubs, or rock gardens in something of the same fashion as the Japanese Zen-style rock gardens of our world. The Imperial Palace in Tiolu, the capital city of Kiarlon, which perches on the Rock, a rising prow of land above the confluence of two major rivers (a site which is easily defensible against attack, but for which the water supply must be carefully husbanded) contains a large rock garden in its rear courtyard, surrounding a small group of megalithic standing stones erected long ago, before the palace was ever built or the Kiarlonchu occupied the site.

A special place is occupied by beekeepers and apiculture: honey is very popular as a sweetener and for making into mead, and beeswax candles are commonly used in the rites of ancestor worship. In the Kiarloni heartland, nearly every community has its local beekeeper, and bees have a particular religious, philosophical and/or mythological significance, the exact nature of which I have not, unfortunately, been able to figure out.

On a side note: hello, everybody! I have been a member of the ZBB since its inception, and of the Virtual Verduria Message Board before that (although I have not been an active member for quite a few years), but I only began following the CBB regularly last year, and only registered as a member (and renewed my ZBB membership) quite recently. Ironically, I have only gained the time to post because I am recovering from (fortunately minor) surgery. Hopefully, I will be able to continue keeping an eye on the board after I return to work.

Next question (my apologies if this has been asked before): do any of your concountries have colonies (overseas, interstellar, etc.), and what is the relationship between such colonies and the mother country?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Parlox » Sun 20 Aug 2017, 00:12

Glenn wrote: Next question (my apologies if this has been asked before): do any of your concountries have colonies (overseas, interstellar, etc.), and what is the relationship between such colonies and the mother country?
To answer your first question,
The country of Purple Keep does have a colony called the YAV. YAV was set up as a scientific base on a large meteorite to study the effect of Gen gas on the human body.

To answer your second question,
The YAV colony gets along well with Purple Keep. The colony has gained some independence from Purple Keep and is aiming for full independence. The colony sends information it finds on Gen gas to the administrators of Purple Keep's SCIATY organization. The colony gets along with Purple keep itself, but not the administrators of SCIATY.

Next question : Are any of your concountries in the middle of civil war? What caused a civil war? Does the rebellion get any help from other Concountries or are they on their own?
Conlangs: Podmåri, Psıhı Mìnungusıqa, Mekhẹ Nâ Tsa Bunawàlǒǒ, Gwynwth, Tänggorosepero, La Patagonê,
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Axiem » Wed 23 Aug 2017, 03:04

Parlox wrote:Are any of your concountries in the middle of civil war? What caused a civil war? Does the rebellion get any help from other Concountries or are they on their own?
There are still large portions of my conworld that are pretty hazy for me, but as far as I know, there's no outright civil war going on. On the whole, Mto is in a relatively stable political state at the moment, with a handful of big players calling the shots.

However, in Kuvia, there are factions of people who are chafing more and more under the autocratic rule of Queen Älkestra, and underground societies are starting to spring up fomenting a potential revolution—though they also have a tendency to get found out and the conspirators and their families purged. That doesn't stop the continued desire, and there's whispers that some other nations (such as Situnya, Nairu, and especially Hîgara) are funding and encouraging this in an attempt to destabilize Kuvia.

Now, whether that will ever end up in all-out civil war...I guess that's what the novels are for ;)

Next question: Does your conworld have eclipses (annular or total), and if so, what do the people think about them?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Rheddie » Thu 24 Aug 2017, 22:24

Next question: Does your conworld have eclipses (annular or total), and if so, what do the people think about them?
For the people of Torn, the Moon symbolises Femininity and the Sun Masculinity. Torn is a heavily masculine society and so the Moon is looked upon with great suspicion.

Things were not always so. In the Time Before Men the Moon was worshipped as a great goddess. The defeat of the demonterror Atalanteon and the end of the Great Deluge was heralded by a great eclipse where the Moon fully covered the Sun.

For the next four hundred years the Moon shone bright in the sky, equal to the sun. But then came the invasion of the Romanians, heralded this time by a lunar eclipse which accompanied the end of the Age.

Eclipses were seen at other times in history too. During the ascendancy of the Rhiannon Eve there was another solar eclipse, quickly followed by a lunar eclipse when the Brenhyn, in his first reign, took revenge upon her. Another lunar eclipse heralded the return of the Brenhyn many centuries later. There has not been a solar eclipse since the end of the Great War, though all who are familiar with the gift of prophesy know that when it comes it will doubtless symbolise a great upheaval, perhaps the breaking of Qorbenic itself.

Question: does writing have any special spiritual significance for your people? (e.g. are letters themselves seen as holy or passed down by the gods, or is there an important tradition of preserving sacred writings?)
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Parlox » Thu 07 Sep 2017, 01:18

Rheddie wrote:
Question: does writing have any special spiritual significance for your people? (e.g. are letters themselves seen as holy or passed down by the gods, or is there an important tradition of preserving sacred writings?)
Most Ddokkods are literate, they don't believe writing has any importance beyond passing on knowledge that would have been forgotten otherwise.

Although on the other hand, Wawas believe that writing can have spiritual meaning, and that reading certain books could significantly boost ones knowledge of the world. Their is even a profession related to this, people who are in this profession are called Hokas. They read and decipher ancient and/or religious texts.

Next Question; Does one of your concultures believe in a form of the afterlife? If so, why?
Conlangs: Podmåri, Psıhı Mìnungusıqa, Mekhẹ Nâ Tsa Bunawàlǒǒ, Gwynwth, Tänggorosepero, La Patagonê,
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Axiem » Thu 07 Sep 2017, 04:07

Parlox wrote: Next Question; Does one of your concultures believe in a form of the afterlife? If so, why?
Turns out, this is a pretty key aspect of my conculture's cosmology/metaphysics. It's not just belief; there's real, tangible truth to the existence of an afterlife.

As a bit of background, Mto is polytheistic, with deities that have interactions with people, and particularly their devotees.

Here's what's currently written on the afterlife for them:
Upon death, a human’s soul is brought forth for the judgement of the deities. Should the human be claimed by a particular deity—almost always the human’s patron in life—then their soul migrates to an etherial palace dedicated to that deity’s worship and service, providing an eternity of bliss for the human. It is possible for this claim to be overridden by the other deities, should they judge the human unfavorably by their scales, which is why humans will still seek the favor of more deities than simply their patron.

Particularly special claims by a deity—usually of their dedicated clergy—can result in the promotion of the human soul into an angel, one of the messengers of that deity.

Should the human not be claimed by any particular deity, they are judged merely on the favor they have from all of the deities. Should the human be favored, then their soul migrates to Elysium, the Land of Bliss. Here, their soul will live an eternity of quiet bliss, if not as blissful as life in an ethereal palace would have been.

If a human has a pledged patron, and has gained enough of that patron’s disfavor, then the deity can banish them to an etherial land of pain and suffering distinctly in opposition to their palace. Here, their soul will exist in a state of ultimate pain and suffering.

On the other hand, should the human be judged unfavorably without special condemnation from their patron, then their soul is banished to Hell, the Land of Torment. Here, their soul will exist in a state of pain and suffering.

Particularly spectacularly disfavored humans can be further banished, their soul sent to the Abyss, where they will wander aimlessly. It is not a place of torment, but rather a place of boredom—until the soul is itself dissolved into the ether, leading to complete ego obliteration.

Most humans therefore pledge themselves to a patron deity, whom they work to form a relationship with and maintain that deity’s favor, while also maintaining favor with the other deities. Some cannot bring themselves to form as deep of a bond with one particular deity, and will act accordingly. And there are a scattered few who disbelieve these stories of the afterlife and decide to take their chances.
There's a name or two of things in there I don't have figured out quite yet.

...this reminds me that I ought to actually release the URL to Mto's website publicly :/

Next question: how does your conculture think disobedient children should be punished, if at all?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Parlox » Thu 07 Sep 2017, 05:49

Axiem wrote:
Next question: how does your conculture think disobedient children should be punished, if at all?
The Ddokkods would probably scold their child, although disobedience is rare as their children are extremely docile.

The Voyntas might spank them, although this depends on who is punishing them, some might just scold them.

The Wawas would probably take away an item of theirs for a time, Wawan children are extremely adventurous, and this can get them in trouble.

The Tobars would probably beat them, then would proceed to buy them a slave to show them they are still loved, after beating their child to a pulp. The Tobars are a extremely sick species, this shows in the way they punish their children.

Aycols would act extremely disappointed, this is the most effective punishment because Aycols are always looking for approval.

Prawts would probably leave their children on a rock above the ocean for a while, Prawts are very attached to the ocean and if they are away for a while they get anxious.

Next question; Are any of your races actively trying to destroy another race, if so why?
Conlangs: Podmåri, Psıhı Mìnungusıqa, Mekhẹ Nâ Tsa Bunawàlǒǒ, Gwynwth, Tänggorosepero, La Patagonê,
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by elemtilas » Thu 07 Sep 2017, 16:23

Parlox wrote:Next question; Are any of your races actively trying to destroy another race, if so why?
Oo, good question!

It's not really that obvious in the Eastlands, but generally speaking in other parts of Gea, Men and Daine are very much at odds with each other. Ever since Men first came up out of the distant South, they've been variously trying to destroy or make nice with Daine. The latter, for their part and to their continuing woe, decided early on to try and teach Men what they knew and had learned from their Elders.

This didn't work out too well and it's resulted in a race of people who are very intelligent and keen, but intellectually and spiritually immature to handle it all. Their energies are turned mostly to war and violence.

The pendulum has certainly swung in different directions through the course of history. At present, the Westlands of the world are teetering on the edge of broad destruction. Men that had been living in Heropea and Hither Atelante have been utterly wiped out or forced to flee over to the Phazzanean provinces. The Reman Pharaoh has had to abandon her capital and all her lands west of the Puntish Sea. A great tragedy for Men as this has quite literally reduced their population by a good 60p.c. From the Daine perspective, they've simply repelled the invasive species from their own territory.

The Men in more southerly regions are now preparing for what looks to be a great war in the regions surrounding the Sea of Sandh. The Ehrraneans certainly are ticked off that their western provinces were destroyed by Pharaoh's ill conceived environmental disasters. The Axiomatics are keen on keeping their trading partners stable, but also are not adverse to some territorial aggrandisement. The Sandhians would not mind ruling the world entirely.

Interesting times for some folks anyway!

Next Question: Pets. Do your folks keep animals (or even near-people?) as pets or animals just for working? Or do people fear and avoid all animals? If so, what kinds of animals are kept as pets and why? What qualities do they look for in a pet?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Parlox » Thu 07 Sep 2017, 17:28

elemtilas wrote: Next Question: Pets. Do your folks keep animals (or even near-people?) as pets or animals just for working? Or do people fear and avoid all animals? If so, what kinds of animals are kept as pets and why? What qualities do they look for in a pet?
Ddokkods

The Ddokkods don't believe in keeping pets without permission from those they are keeping, this makes for some wierd relations between owner and pet. The most common way for a Ddokkod to get a pet is to find a bored, wandering Dvoed. If the Dvoed permits it, they might be taking as a pet. The owner-pet relationship is odd, instead of being commanded to perform an action, they will politely ask.

As i said they commonly have Dvoeds, although Wawas aren't too rare for beach Ddokkods, sometimes they even take Maanyaans.
Pets are mainly obtained so a Ddokkod has a creature to bond with, although sometimes a pet might be obtained for training other pets.

Tobars

The Tobars love taking "pets", they often travel to foreign lands to acquire more "pets", these "pets" are abused, raped, starved, and maybe even killed during the course of their time there. They prefer to take the Voyntas, although the Voyntas aren't really very keen on being enslaved.

Tobars usually look for the most interesting Voyntas, they then take it back to their homeland and as i stated above, abuse, rape, and starve them. Although sometimes a "pet" is fed and let work out so they maintain their beauty, these one tend to be the prettiest or smartest ones.

Wawas

Wawas do take pets, they are usually used for comfort and care. Some common pets are the Fimu geckos, Bogins, and recently even baby Whatlets, although Wawas aren't yet aware of how big Whatlets get.

Wawas usually look for pets that like to cuddle, appearance isn't too much of a factor as Wawas have fuzzy eyesight anyways.

Voyntas

Voyntas keep personal pets meant to help them hunt or carry stuff around. A common pet is the Isotyur. Voyntas like medium sized, strong animals that can swimm.

Next question; How does your conculture view prostitution?
Last edited by Parlox on Fri 08 Sep 2017, 04:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Axiem » Fri 08 Sep 2017, 04:13

Didn't you just ask that question?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Parlox » Fri 08 Sep 2017, 04:16

Axiem wrote:Didn't you just ask that question?
Yeah, i just realized. I've changed the post.
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by elemtilas » Fri 08 Sep 2017, 11:44

Parlox wrote:Next question; How does your conculture view prostitution?
Unknown among the Daine of any kindred. If we accept that humans may be likened to chimpanzees; then I'd posit that Daine are more alike to bonobos.

Among Men in Auntimoany, there are several classes of prostitutes, each attached by certain rights and expectations. There are in some places sacred prostitutes. These are monastics of certain Rumelian sects for whom sex is an act of worship. Among the Thietish folk of Auntimoany, this is looked at slightly askance. Presumably because the native Thietish Pagans do not practice religious prostitution.

Of the more mundane sorts, there are two kinds. First are the noble prostitutes, then the walkers. Also known as the Sisterhood, the noble prostitutes are those who are House based. Organised in the fashion of a guild, the Houses offer a higher class of product. Such women are well educated in all the classics and offer a wide variety of services from escort to party services and youth education. These are respectable women and enjoy a high degree of legal protection and social sanction. The walkers, on the other hand, are definitely a more low class situation. They offer basic quick and dirty only. High volume at low cost. While the practice is not, strictly speaking, illegal, such women may be breaking other laws. They are not, generally speaking, afforded a great deal of protection and rarely seek justice for crimes committed against them. These women do not attract respect, and are called by various monikers such as "sausage peelers", "pavement inspectors", "nut crackers" and "eel suckers".

Next question: What sorts of curious customs do your folks engage in? (E.g., the Horndance or church clipping or well dressing or beating the bounds.)
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Parlox » Tue 19 Sep 2017, 06:55

elemtilas wrote: Next question: What sorts of curious customs do your folks engage in? (E.g., the Horndance or church clipping or well dressing or beating the bounds.)
So far the best(although not great) answer i have is an odd after-death ritual for Oavays, this is a bit NSFW.
Spoiler:
When a family member dies, their cousins will likely come and have sex with their bodys, their siblings might join in depending on the person’s wishes. After this is finished the body will be floated to the surface of the ocean on a raft, and covered in glowing bacteria. They will then light the body on fire and send it into the ocean. For three days afterwards the closer family members will search for the body, once they find it they will float it down into the depths of the ocean.
Next Question; Do any of your worlds species have special powers?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Reyzadren » Sun 08 Oct 2017, 13:21

Parlox wrote:Next Question; Do any of your worlds species have special powers?
Everyone and everything has powers/abilities/skills/moves, even your fridge can use Ice beam. It's just a matter of some things having lesser power for other attributes, as well as those who choose not to bother with using powers. The capability is there for all to learn and harness for themselves.


Next question: Vehicles in your conworld that are not utilised on Earth?
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